Browse Campaigns - ARCHIVE

Storytelling has the power to motivate us, inspire us, support us, and change us. With your support, Ad Council PSAs and other creative work impact the lives of millions of Americans by telling human stories and meeting people where they are to relay critical information on the day’s most pressing issues, from COVID-19 to racial justice, from mental health to gun safety. Here’s where you can learn more about all of our campaigns.
Over the past year, America has faced the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. People in need of financial assistance may not know which assistance programs they qualify for or how to navigate them. Some may feel shame in asking for help, or struggle with their mental health in their time of need.

211 is a one-stop resource for help accessing essential resources we all deserve, including federal, state, and local benefits. The 211 Benefits Awareness campaign raises awareness of 211 as a guiding light in each community, ready to help curate resources and advocate for those in need to help build a better life.

The campaign encourages audiences to call the 211 helpline or visit 211.org to get connected and get help.
Thousands of teens in foster care are waiting for the love and support from a family, but unfortunately almost 20,000 young people leave foster care without a family every year. Families that adopt teens provide them with stability during a critical period in their lives. Teens that have been adopted are more likely to graduate, go to college, and be more emotionally secure than their peers that have ‘aged out’ of foster care without the security and encouragement of family.

Inspired by real families’ stories, this honest and heartfelt campaign reveals the remarkable value of adoption for both teens and parents. With the tagline, “You can’t imagine the reward,” these emotional messages reassure prospective parents and inspire them to consider adopting a teen.

This successful campaign has contributed to the more than 870,000 children and youth that have been adopted from the U.S. foster care system since 2004.
Close family members know their loved ones best, and are typically the first to notice memory issues or cognitive problems but they’re often hesitant to initiate a conversation—even when they know something is wrong.

For those with Alzheimer’s and their family members, an early diagnosis can help decrease the burden of the disease by allowing more time for critical care planning. That’s why it’s so important to have these conversations.

To tell real, relatable stories of families who have benefited from early detection we created the “Our Stories” campaign in partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association. The campaign empowers people to have these critical conversations with loved ones when they notice something is different. The website Alz.org/OurStories offers families helpful tools and resources, including information on the disease and the benefits of an early diagnosis, as well as interactive conversation starters.
Though autism can be reliably diagnosed in children as young as 18 months, most aren’t diagnosed until they’re between four and five—and studies indicate that age is even higher for low-income and minority children. Research shows that early diagnosis and early intervention is crucial; it can translate to a lifetime of impact by supporting healthy development, improved communication, and overall positive outcomes later in life. Bilingual campaign creative assets aim to lower the age of diagnosis by showing parents and caregivers the positive outcomes that are possible following a diagnosis.
We’ve all had moments where we’ve felt we didn’t belong, but for people who moved to this country, that feeling lasts more than a moment. We all want to feel safe and included in the community we call home, but today, too many of our neighbors experience exclusion, isolation, harassment, and even violence on the basis of their identity.

Belonging Begins with Us is a new campaign with PSAs that empower viewers to foster a more welcoming nation where everyone - regardless of background - feels they belong. Each of us has the power to welcome others into our communities.

Visit BelongingBeginsWithUs.org to read real stories of welcoming and belonging from across the country and find ways to get involved in your own community.
The Ad Council has focused on drunk driving prevention since 1983, with the release of the now-classic “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk” campaign. As the idea of a designated driver became the cultural norm, but alcohol-related driving fatalities began to increase, we recognized the need for a new approach. In 2005, we refreshed our classic campaign with a new message: “Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving."

The most recent iteration of the Buzzed Driving Prevention campaign effort prompts young men 21 to 34 to examine their own warning signs of impairment and take responsibility for their decisions behind the wheel by reminding them: If you need to do something to make yourself feel okay to drive, you're not okay to drive.
There are 48 million unpaid family caregivers in the United States. Most caregivers are family members or friends who are working, managing their own families and caring for their loved ones at the same time. For many, the caregiving role doesn’t start all at once—it starts with simple things like scheduling a doctor’s visit or helping with daily errands, then gradually expands until it becomes a major commitment. On average, caregivers provide 23 hours of care a week, the equivalent of an unpaid, part-time job.

Since 2011, we have encouraged caregivers to care not only for their loved ones, but also for themselves. To date, the campaign has targeted several audiences: general market women age 40 to 60, male caregivers age 35 to 60, and Hispanic/Latino and African American/Black caregivers with an emphasis on women ages 35 to 60.

The campaign directs viewers to AARP’s Family Caregiving site, where caregivers can find free Care Guides, self-care tips, planning resources, legal and financial guidance, and more.
Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for children under 13. This campaign encourages parents and caregivers to correctly buckle up their kids in the right seat for their age and size by reminding them of the importance of getting the big stuff, like car safety, right.

To ensure parents and caregivers are properly securing their children in the best car seat restraint for their age and size, they can visit NHTSA.gov/TheRightSeat or NHTSA.gov/Protegidos.
99% of climate scientists agree: climate change is here, it’s man-made and we’re running out of time to tackle it. Yet, people still feel disconnected from the issue. Parents are especially concerned because their children will be the most impacted by climate change’s consequences, but they don’t feel confident talking about the issue and they don’t understand how to help.

Science Moms is a group of nonpartisan climate scientists and mothers who have dedicated their lives to solving the problem and are now reaching out to other parents for reinforcement. Their emotional campaign aims to connect with mothers of all political persuasions about what’s at stake for their children and how together, mothers can be the force that finally ushers in an era of solutions.
In response to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the Ad Council - in partnership with the federal government, public health partners, board member companies, major media networks and digital platforms – has launched a series of national PSAs and multi-channel content to provide critical and urgent messages to the American public about Coronavirus. The Coronavirus Response campaign includes a variety of research-based, targeted efforts focusing on mask use, social distancing, mental health, and more. These PSAs are intended to reach individual communities with messaging that resonates and addresses each audience’s unique motivators and barriers to action. Specific audiences include all Americans, conservatives, Black Americans, Hispanic Americans and Gen Z.

Share these critical messages to help educate the public during this unprecedented time. For more information, visit Coronavirus.gov.
The COVID-19 vaccines have the potential to transform life as we know it today and save hundreds of thousands of lives—but they can only be successful if millions of Americans recognize the urgency, safety and vital importance of getting vaccinated.

While many have already started the vaccination process, there is currently a general lack of confidence. Overall, 40% of the U.S. public have expressed concerns, ranging from “skeptical” to “open but uncertain,” about getting vaccinated.

The It’s Up to You campaign encourages audiences to get the latest vaccine information—knowing that personal education is the first step in building vaccine confidence. It’s OK to have questions. We want to acknowledge Americans’ concerns, provide answers to their questions, and get us all on the road back to the moments and people we miss most.

To see common questions and get more vaccine information, visit our consumer site here: www.GetVaccineAnswers.org.

To learn more about the COVID-19 Vaccine Education Initiative and access partner toolkits, visit our industry partner page here: www.AdCouncil.org/COVID-Vaccine
Millions of people are impacted each year by natural disasters. The best way to help those affected is by donating money rather than goods. Financial donations help support communities in the immediate aftermath of a disaster and are also critical for longer-term recovery efforts—they can respond to changing needs as people move to safety, resettle, or rebuild.

This campaign enables us to get into market quickly, usually within a few days of a disaster, when funds are needed most. It’s been used to fundraise for disasters like the California wildfires; hurricanes Harvey, Maria, Irma, and Katrina; and the earthquake in Nepal.

We drive consumers to SupportDisasterRelief.org and encourage donations to the victims of specific disasters as they happen, with funds distributed through GlobalGiving.
Since 2009, the Ad Council and USDA Forest Service’s Discover the Forest campaign has encouraged parents and caregivers to take their families out to the forest to experience and reconnect with nature. Our latest creative work highlights the power of authentic storytelling to showcase the forest as a place where families can deepen their connection with each other and with the outdoors, while making the forest part of their story.

Stories come to life at local parks and forests. They're places full of wonder, where imagination thrives, stories come to life, and memories are made. Our campaign encourages Latino and Black parents and caregivers to make the forest part of their family’s story by experiencing nature firsthand.
Hate crimes are on the rise, and yet 85% of Americans consider themselves unprejudiced.

Bias and discrimination are among the most pressing issues facing our nation today. Love Has No Labels is a movement to promote acceptance and inclusion of all people across race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age and ability.

Throughout its duration, Love Has No Labels has opened a dialogue about our implicit biases—our assumptions, stereotypes, and unintentional actions toward others based on their perceived differences or labels—and erodes those biases by flooding the market with diverse images of love.

We believe love is the most powerful force to overcome bias. Together, we can create a more inclusive world.
Although several states have legalized marijuana use, driving when impaired by any substance remains illegal in all 50 states and in Washington, D.C.

Many marijuana users don’t see a problem with driving after use, but research shows marijuana can slow reaction time, impair judgment of distance, and decrease coordination - all skills necessary for the safe operating of a vehicle.

Our campaign targets young men aged 18 to 35, many of whom reject the common stereotypes of marijuana users - and reminds viewers that if you feel different, you drive different. Don't drive high.
In recent years, devastating earthquakes, tornadoes, floods and wildfires have highlighted the need for all Americans, regardless of background or location, to prepare for natural disaster. However, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), half of Americans have not discussed or developed a family emergency plan.

Since 2003, our campaign has empowered individuals, families, small businesses, and communities to prepare for both natural and man-made disasters. “Ready” recommends taking four steps towards preparedness:

1. Be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate protective actions.

2. Make a family emergency plan including information on how to reconnect and reunite.

3. Build emergency supply kits to ensure you’re prepared whether you’re at home, at work, or in the car.

4. Get involved by finding opportunities to support community preparedness.

The Ready campaign now includes PSAs developed specifically for a Latino audience, in addition to the general market work that encourages, educates, and empowers families to develop their own emergency preparedness plans by visiting Listo.gov/plan or Ready.gov/plan.
Recent hurricanes, blizzards and blackouts have shown New Yorkers the importance of being prepared for an emergency. However, thirty-three percent of New York residents have said they do not have any form of household emergency plan, and 66% do not have all of the recommended emergency supplies. On top of that, only 28% said they have a plan for how to find family members and reunite in the event of an emergency.

Launched in 2009, “Ready New York” is the New York City Emergency Management’s public education campaign for emergency preparedness—it’s designed to encourage the city’s 8.5 million residents to prepare for both natural and man-made emergencies and increase awareness of NYC EM’s suite of resources.

The latest campaign, in both English and Spanish, reminds New Yorkers that while you can’t be ready for every little disaster in life, you can prepare yourself and your family for a big one – like hurricanes, blizzards, blackouts, and more. The campaign urges New Yorkers to make an emergency plan today at NYC.gov/readyny or call 311.
While women make up half of the U.S. college-educated workforce, they hold only a little over a fourth of all STEM jobs. Research shows that young girls like STEM subjects—science, technology, engineering and math—but often feel that STEM isn’t for them due to outdated stereotypes. Girls are scared to fail in STEM, but She Can STEM shows girls that STEM is in everything, and experimenting is part of the journey.

She Can STEM inspires middle school girls to stay interested in STEM by showcasing how messy, experimental and hands-on STEM can be, and how daring to STEM can change the world.
These are uncertain times for everyone, but for households facing hunger, the coronavirus fallout—including school closures and job disruptions—can present an even greater threat. Millions of Americans, including children, will turn to food banks for much needed support.

As the largest hunger-relief organization in the United States, The Feeding America network of food banks feeds millions of families each year, especially during times of disasters and national emergencies. Updated PSAs encourage audiences to donate to Feeding America’s COVID-19 Response Fund to help families in this time of urgent need.
What is #Dadication? It's just like dedication but it means that as a father, you never stop being a dad. There’s no one right way as long as you show up for your kids, even when it's not so easy.

The Fatherhood Involvement campaign PSAs highlight the diverse experiences of real dads who share a commitment to being there for their kids through parenting highlights and challenges. By acknowledging the hard work they put forth in the face of hardships, the campaign seeks to provide all fathers with confidence to keep going in their efforts to be present for their children.

All PSAs direct audiences to visit Fatherhood.gov for parenting tips, fatherhood programs, and other resources.
The End Family Fire campaign highlights the importance of safe gun storage and introduces the term “family fire,” giving a name to any shooting that involves an improperly stored or misused gun found in the home. Unintentional shootings, suicide, and intentional shootings are all forms of family fire.

With about 43 percent of U.S. adults living in a household where there is a firearm, family fire is an issue that affects communities across the country. Now, more than ever, storing guns safely – locked, unloaded, and separately from ammunition – can keep our families and communities safe.

To best protect your loved ones – store guns safely.
Nearly half of all adults in the United States have high blood pressure, and 50% of those with high blood pressure do not have their condition under control. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to heart attack, stroke and other serious health issues.

However, people with high blood pressure can create a treatment plan with their doctor that can help reduce their risk.

Our campaign features survivors of heart attacks and strokes who encourage people with high blood pressure to talk to their doctor about starting—or restarting—a treatment plan that works for them.

Your blood pressure numbers could change your life. Start taking the right steps at ManageYourBP.org.
For more than 34 million American adults without a high school diploma, opportunities are limited. Many are living in poverty. But it’s not too late.

Since 2010, FinishYourDiploma.org has connected more than one million people with free adult education classes to help them earn their high school equivalency, so they can connect to a better tomorrow.
Lung cancer is the #1 cancer killer of men and women. Compared to other cancers, it has one of the lowest survival rates, but with the new lung cancer screening, approximately fourteen million people in the U.S. who are at high risk for lung cancer can be saved with this early detection and treatment. If everyone at high risk were screened, close to 48,000 lives could be saved.

“Saved By The Scan” drives current and former smokers to take a lung cancer screening eligibility quiz at SavedByTheScan.org. Since the campaign’s launch in August 2017, 26% of quiz respondents have been eligible for a low-dose CT scan.

The campaign has saved lives and continues to educate.
There is a mental health crisis among our country’s youth. Young adolescents (10-14) are experiencing increased rates of mental health challenges and youth of color, in particular, face the additional trauma of systemic racism and greater challenges in accessing the support they need.

Sound It Out uses the power of music to help parents and caregivers have meaningful conversations with their middle schoolers about emotional wellbeing. We paired middle-school aged kids and their caregivers with musical artists, like KAMAUU, Tobe Nwigwe, Empress Of, and Lauren Jauregui, to create an album of exclusive songs inspired by the emotions in their conversations. The album is available at SoundItOutTogether.org and EscuchandoSentimientos.org, where caregivers can also access free, expert-vetted resources to guide conversations with their child about emotional wellbeing.
Please air December 26 - 31.

Project Roadblock is a multiplatform drunk driving prevention campaign exclusive to local broadcast television stations and is the largest annual station-supported initiative of a single PSA campaign. Sponsored by TVB, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and the Ad Council, Project Roadblock inspires dialogue about the dangers of drinking and driving and subsequently motivates men 21-34 years-old to stop driving ‘buzzed.’

Now in its 18th year, Project Roadblock has proven its ability to inspire change, create impact, and save lives. In fact, through continued support of Project Roadblock and in combination with other drinking and driving prevention efforts, alcohol-impaired motor vehicle fatalities have decreased from 14,409 in 2004 to 10,142 in 2019, which is 28% of motor vehicle fatalities. However, there is still more work to be done. In December 2019, over 830 people were involved in an alcohol-impaired driving fatality and 296 people were killed in traffic fatalities on New Year’s Day. With your help this upcoming December, the road to safety continues.


It's important to support Project Roadblock during the December 26 - 31 period. Get ahead of the curve by downloading and slotting these PSAs into these dates!

Join This Year:
1. Pledge your station’s support.
2. Donate on-air, online, and social media inventory
3. Monetize with sponsorship. The deadline for sponsorship applications is December 16th, 2021.

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Racism and oppression have historically impacted and continue to profoundly affect Black and Brown communities and the nation at large. The pandemic has drawn further light to racial inequities, including a rise in anti-Asian hate. The Ad Council is committed to using our platform to support other external organizations dedicated to dismantling systemic racism and injustice.

In this series, we’re spotlighting content created by these organizations that will help spark more dialogue and action around racial justice. We hope you’ll take the time to learn more about these organizations and the great work that they’re doing.

Courageous Conversation Global Foundation’s Not a Gun Campaign

Black people are 3X more likely than white people to be killed by the police. The award-winning Not a Gun campaign from Courageous Conversation Global Foundation aims to address the systemic issue of police brutality against people of color by highlighting unconscious racial bias.

The Asian American Foundation’s See Us Unite Campaign

See Us Unite is a cultural campaign designed to accelerate impact and expand support for the AAPI community through solidarity and education. From the sciences to the arts, from sports to public service, these spots highlight how Asian Americans have had a long history of making meaningful contributions to American society.

IPG Dxtra’s Dear White Parents Campaign

For generations, Black and Brown parents have discussed racism with their children to prepare them to deal with the racism they are likely to face. Conversely, a recent survey indicates that many White parents haven’t spoken with their children about race and racism. People’s views of race are influenced by their parents, resulting in inter-generational impact. To help raise an anti-racist generation, Dear White Parents is a new public awareness campaign from IPG Dxtra that encourages more white parents to talk to their children about racism early and often.
America is facing a looming retirement savings crisis, and future generations will have a lower standard of living due to financial insecurity.

People 50 and older are the fastest growing age segment in America, and they can expect to pay for a longer retirement. Yet nearly seven in 10 Americans approaching retirement having less than a year’s income saved.

Since 2017, we have empowered adults 45 to 60 to prepare for their retirement. The campaign directs viewers to a three-minute online chat with Avo, a friendly digital retirement coach. After completing the chat, viewers receive a personalized retirement savings action plan with free tips to help them take charge of their financial futures today.
Millions of healthy and treatable cats and dogs need help finding a home. While every shelter pet is unique, there’s one thing they have in common - they’re all pure love.

“#AdoptPureLove” builds off previous work and celebrates the unique traits of shelter pets that create incredible bonds with their human parents.

Our campaign includes personal stories that spotlights the bond between celebrities and athletes and their pets, as well as everyday people, all of whom encourage potential pet owners to adopt from animal shelters and rescue groups.

In 2019, over 1.6M people visited ShelterPetProject.org to find an adoptable pet near them.
Young adulthood is a critical time, when many people experience mental health issues and significant stress from life transitions like moving from home and beginning college or a career.

Seize the Awkward empowers young adults to help friends who are struggling with mental health issues (and who may be at risk for suicide) by encouraging them to consistently start and sustain conversations about mental health with their friends.

The new iteration of the campaign, “Whatever Gets You Talking,” showcases the variety of ways young people can start and continue those conversations with their friends, whether that be through a GIF, emoji, call or text.

The campaign drives to SeizeTheAwkward.org, where visitors can explore resources and tools to help them start a conversation with a peer around mental health.
Messaging while driving—whether sending a text, commenting on a photo, or connecting with friends via an app—is dangerous. But even though 94% of Americans recognize it’s dangerous to send a text while driving, and 91% recognize it’s dangerous to read one, many people still do it.

To address the disconnect between awareness and behavior, our campaign addresses the fact that people are personally engaging in a behavior that they know is dangerous. The campaign reminds drivers from 16 to 34 that no one is special enough to message while driving.
More than one in three American adults have prediabetes and are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes —a serious health condition that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Of these individuals, more than 80% of people with prediabetes don't know they have it.Thankfully, the vast majority of people with prediabetes can take steps to reduce their risk. Through weight loss, diet changes, and increased physical activity, prediabetes can often be reversed.

These PSAs encourage viewers to visit the campaign website where they can take a one-minute risk test to know where they stand. The campaign highlights the importance of early diagnosis, speaking with your doctor and visiting DoIHavePrediabetes.org to learn more about prediabetes.
For more than 75 years, Smokey Bear has protected our forests and promoted wildfire prevention. His powerful message, “Only you can prevent wildfires,” is at the heart of America’s longest-running PSA campaign.

Smokey’s message remains relevant today, as nearly nine out of ten wildfires nationwide are caused by humans and can be prevented. Additionally, during these unprecedented times, spending time outdoors has never felt more valuable. Whether we’re passing the time in public lands or in our own backyards, we all have a role to play in keeping our safe places safe by acting responsibly and doing our part to help prevent wildfires.

For tips on safe recreation, visit BeOutdoorSafe.org and for more information on wildfire prevention, visit SmokeyBear.com.
Vaping has become a health epidemic for our kids. Nearly 8,000 kids start vaping every day, but parents can play an important role in preventing their kid from using e-cigarettes. Did you know that one vape pod can contain as much nicotine as one pack of cigarettes, which can harm the attention, memory, and brain development of children? With 5.4 million American kids already vaping, it’s important that parents talk to their children about the dangers of trying e-cigarettes.

“Talk About Vaping” drives parents to TalkAboutVaping.org so they can Get Their Head Out of the Cloud and learn the facts about youth vaping so they can have proactive and ongoing conversations with their children about the dangers of vaping.